Salmon En Croute

I can’t get enough of Salmon! So today, I have another special salmon recipe. This time it’s en croute style, a French term for anything baked in pastry.


Baking salmon is quite challenging because it dries out easily. Yet, baking is a very common household cooking technique because it’s simple and easy. And it gives salmon a slightly firm flake instead of mushy texture. Baked salmon could turn too dry and hard though especially when overdone.


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Spinach and Liverwurst Dip

How many different ways can you eat or serve a German liverwurst or liver sausage besides in a cold sandwich with freshly sliced onions, maybe a few lettuce leaves, and mayo or mustard dressing?


This type of German sausage is not too versatile or flexible like any other kind of sausage because of the depth of its flavor as it is made from liver and other organ meat (offal) which generally has a mushy texture too.


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Salmon and Potato En Papillote w/ Coconut Curry Sauce

savory spicy
I don’t know how else to properly describe this recipe except that it’s healthy, clean and very light in the belly. The combination of coconut milk, curry, and honey gives it a very Southeast Asian flavor with a mild spicy kick of cayenne pepper.


Besides the salmon, the rest of the ingredients are plant-based which dissolve easily in the stomach.

Salmon is a great source of omega-3 fatty acids, which help in keeping the heart healthy.  It is also an excellent source of protein, vitamin B12, vitamin D, selenium, niacin, phosphorus and vitamin B6 for whole body wellness, strong bones and joints, brain and neurological repair, according to Mayo Clinic research.

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Coconut Cream Pie Makeover

I will not apologize for deconstructing this classic Coconut Cream Pie recipe because the result was equally creamy and delightful. I took layers and layers of high-fat ingredients and brought them down to the bare essentials.


I took the pastry out of the crust equation. I didn’t use either the traditional graham crackers or any wafer or cookies for the crust. Instead I grabbed some granola bars (or call it by its many other names: breakfast bars, energy bars, diet bars, etc.) and microwaved them to turn crumbly. Molding the crumbled granola into the pie pan wasn’t too challenging, they formed pretty easy.

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Bread-Crusted Salmon

April is an important month for most Christians who still observe Lent which begins on Ash Wednesday and ends Easter Sunday. This event is observed mainly in the Anglican, Eastern Orthodox, Lutheran, Methodist, and Roman Catholic Churches.


Where I came from, the observance of Lent is very colorful and elaborately ritualistic. Devotees are literally crucified to a wooden cross out of personal conviction and belief that by doing the crucifixion, they will be redeemed from their sins. I’m sure modern-day believers would raise eyebrows on these practices. But it’s a tradition and people from my culture have lived through such traditions for centuries that observance of the Lent has become more of a ceremonial rather than personal devotion.

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Six Tastes Kitchen just turned 1-Year old!

Someone had asked me, why do I blog? Do I make money of it?
And my answer was,  It gives me a sense of purpose!

I started this blog simply as a hobby. After blogging for a year, I realized it has turned into a commitment – a commitment to promote healthy food choices. 

Just like this amazing product I found recently, the GoMacro high-protein energy bars! The company’s motivation is very inspiring – it promotes a wholefood-based lifestyle. All their energy bars are certified organic, verified non-GMO, and made only from natural plant-based ingredients that are sourced sustainably (read: not harming the environment). And GoMacro is also a local company based in Viola, WI.

For Six Tastes Kitchen’s 1st Year Anniversary, GoMacro sent me a few samples to try and use for my recipes.

Gomacro-bars-inside macrobar-cashew-

To GoMacro and to All of You
Thank you and please continue to support Six Tastes Kitchen ❤

Beef Nilaga (Boiled Beef Soup)

This is how I would celebrate Saint Patrick’s Day this year. Instead of going for Corned Beef and Cabbage boiled dinner, I’d go for Filipino-style boiled beef soup which we call Nilaga. This is a very similar clear broth dish in terms of ingredients and cooking style.


This is the supreme comfort food in the Philippines. It is served all year round even on a hot summer day. Unlike the Irish corned beef and cabbage, Nilaga doesn’t usually include carrots but may sometimes include string beans or sweet corn roundels, if corn is in season. Bokchoy, Napa cabbage or Chinese cabbage could be used as well instead of head of cabbage.  As for the meat, Filipinos usually use beef brisket, shank or tendons. Often, pork ribs and pork belly are also used as cheaper substitutes.

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Irish Soda Biscuit

This recipe is not your traditional butter biscuit or an Irish soda bread. The difference is – it has other “fun” ingredients which added more depth to its flavor such as dried fruits, nuts and aromatic spices like fennel. The Irish calls it the Americanized version of their soda bread. Traditional Irish Soda bread has only 4 basic ingredients: flour, baking soda, salt and buttermilk. And unlike typical biscuits, this recipe uses baking soda instead of baking powder, so it’s more crumbly than flaky.

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Creamy Potato Basil Soup

When I thought I was done making soup for cold winter days because it already felt like Spring here in Wisconsin in the middle of February; then came a big snow storm just couple of days ago. Only in Wisconsin where you have such a Spring-like weather in 4 days and a snow storm on the 5th day.


But anyway, I was craving for hot soup so I decided to make an easy and light creamy potato basil soup without using any heavy cream or cream soup in cans. Instead, I made roux which is a paste-like texture of flour and butter mixture cooked on low heat. Roux is used to thicken sauces and soups. When you add milk into the roux paste, you create béchamel or white sauce, which is the base of most cream soups.
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