Salmon and Potato En Papillote w/ Coconut Curry Sauce

savory spicy
I don’t know how else to properly describe this recipe except that it’s healthy, clean and very light in the belly. The combination of coconut milk, curry, and honey gives it a very Southeast Asian flavor with a mild spicy kick of cayenne pepper.

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Besides the salmon, the rest of the ingredients are plant-based which dissolve easily in the stomach.

Salmon is a great source of omega-3 fatty acids, which help in keeping the heart healthy.  It is also an excellent source of protein, vitamin B12, vitamin D, selenium, niacin, phosphorus and vitamin B6 for whole body wellness, strong bones and joints, brain and neurological repair, according to Mayo Clinic research.

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My (all) American Easter Brunch

Happy Easter to All!

Easter is one of the most awaited festivals for most kids in America not much due to its religious connotations but more due to the fanfare that goes with it such as Easter egg hunt, Easter gift baskets of sweets and goodies, Easter parade, and the Sunday Easter brunch specials.

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Coconut Cream Pie Makeover

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I will not apologize for deconstructing this classic Coconut Cream Pie recipe because the result was equally creamy and delightful. I took layers and layers of high-fat ingredients and brought them down to the bare essentials.

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I took the pastry out of the crust equation. I didn’t use either the traditional graham crackers or any wafer or cookies for the crust. Instead I grabbed some granola bars (or call it by its many other names: breakfast bars, energy bars, diet bars, etc.) and microwaved them to turn crumbly. Molding the crumbled granola into the pie pan wasn’t too challenging, they formed pretty easy.

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Bread-Crusted Salmon

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April is an important month for most Christians who still observe Lent which begins on Ash Wednesday and ends Easter Sunday. This event is observed mainly in the Anglican, Eastern Orthodox, Lutheran, Methodist, and Roman Catholic Churches.

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Where I came from, the observance of Lent is very colorful and elaborately ritualistic. Devotees are literally crucified to a wooden cross out of personal conviction and belief that by doing the crucifixion, they will be redeemed from their sins. I’m sure modern-day believers would raise eyebrows on these practices. But it’s a tradition and people from my culture have lived through such traditions for centuries that observance of the Lent has become more of a ceremonial rather than personal devotion.

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Anniversary

Six Tastes Kitchen just turned 1-Year old!

Someone had asked me, why do I blog? Do I make money of it?
And my answer was,  It gives me a sense of purpose!

I started this blog simply as a hobby. After blogging for a year, I realized it has turned into a commitment – a commitment to promote healthy food choices. 

Just like this amazing product I found recently, the GoMacro high-protein energy bars! The company’s motivation is very inspiring – it promotes a wholefood-based lifestyle. All their energy bars are certified organic, verified non-GMO, and made only from natural plant-based ingredients that are sourced sustainably (read: not harming the environment). And GoMacro is also a local company based in Viola, WI.

For Six Tastes Kitchen’s 1st Year Anniversary, GoMacro sent me a few samples to try and use for my recipes.

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To GoMacro and to All of You
Thank you and please continue to support Six Tastes Kitchen ❤
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Beef Nilaga (Boiled Beef Soup)

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This is how I would celebrate Saint Patrick’s Day this year. Instead of going for Corned Beef and Cabbage boiled dinner, I’d go for Filipino-style boiled beef soup which we call Nilaga. This is a very similar clear broth dish in terms of ingredients and cooking style.

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This is the supreme comfort food in the Philippines. It is served all year round even on a hot summer day. Unlike the Irish corned beef and cabbage, Nilaga doesn’t usually include carrots but may sometimes include string beans or sweet corn roundels, if corn is in season. Bokchoy, Napa cabbage or Chinese cabbage could be used as well instead of head of cabbage.  As for the meat, Filipinos usually use beef brisket, shank or tendons. Often, pork ribs and pork belly are also used as cheaper substitutes.

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Irish Soda Biscuit

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This recipe is not your traditional butter biscuit or an Irish soda bread. The difference is – it has other “fun” ingredients which added more depth to its flavor such as dried fruits, nuts and aromatic spices like fennel. The Irish calls it the Americanized version of their soda bread. Traditional Irish Soda bread has only 4 basic ingredients: flour, baking soda, salt and buttermilk. And unlike typical biscuits, this recipe uses baking soda instead of baking powder, so it’s more crumbly than flaky.

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Creamy Potato Basil Soup

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When I thought I was done making soup for cold winter days because it already felt like Spring here in Wisconsin in the middle of February; then came a big snow storm just couple of days ago. Only in Wisconsin where you have such a Spring-like weather in 4 days and a snow storm on the 5th day.

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But anyway, I was craving for hot soup so I decided to make an easy and light creamy potato basil soup without using any heavy cream or cream soup in cans. Instead, I made roux which is a paste-like texture of flour and butter mixture cooked on low heat. Roux is used to thicken sauces and soups. When you add milk into the roux paste, you create béchamel or white sauce, which is the base of most cream soups.
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Venison Jerky

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During hunting season in Wisconsin from mid-September to December, we have a bounty of venison meat in the big freezer in our basement. Last Christmas, as additional gifts to the kids (grownup kids) we gave them pounds of frozen packed venison hamburger plus a few pounds of frozen packed tenderloin steaks to take home with them.

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My man is a seasoned hunter; he hunts deer, guts them out in the woods and brings home the carcass and the heart. He has certain way of butchering and packaging venison as well as his little celebratory ritual, as I call it.

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Wisconsin Cheese Curd Meatballs with Marinara Sauce

savorysweetWisconsin Specials
Besides Badgers and Green Bay Packers, cheese is Wisconsin’s next great pride. And only in Wisconsin where you can find deep-fried cheese curds in almost all sports bar in any town and local fast-food restaurants such as Culvers. They are even served at Mcdonald’s in most of its Wisconsin locations and also available at some A&W and Dairy Queen locations in the state.

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What are cheese curds made of?

Cheese curds are product of cheese making process. Before cheese are formed into blocks or wheels and aged, they start out as curds. Fresh cheese curds have a slightly rubbery texture and squeak when eaten. Hence, they are often known here in the Midwest as squeaky cheese. They squeak because the elastic protein strands in cheese curds rub against the enamel of the teeth and create the squeak.

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